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LGP2 - Conference of Dr. Mark Staiger on all-cellulose composites

Published on May 29, 2013
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June 18, 2013

Dr Mark Staiger, Senior Lecturer at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, invited by the LGP2 laboratory, give a lecture on June 18, 2013 entitled "An overview of all-cellulose composites."

Dr. Mark Staiger is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Canterbury (Christchurch, New Zealand) and is an Associate Investigator with the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology. Dr. Staiger graduated from Monash University (Melbourne, Australia), obtaining both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from the Department of Materials Engineering. While at UC, Dr. Staiger has developed an eclectic mix of research groups in the areas of biocomposites, nanofibres and biodegradable metals. Dr. Staiger's group has laboratories set up for the production of light alloys and nanofibres (electrospinning), corrosion analysis, thermal analysis of polymers and composites, and comprehensive facilities for the mechanical testing of materials under a wide range of different environmental conditions.

Elementary cellulose fibrils have the highest specific stiffness of all natural materials and their specific tensile strength also ranks above most alternatives. Hence, cellulosic materials have the potential to play an important role in the future development of sustainable alternatives to commonly used petroleum-based materials used in conventional composite materials.

However, the high properties of cellulose are not exploited in many cellulose-containing biocomposites due to poor bonding between the cellulosic fibre and polymer matrix. Strong fibre-matrix adhesion allows an improved load transfer throughout the composite and will largely determine the mechanical efficiency of the composite. Typically, biocomposites utilise chemically different materials for the reinforcement (hydrophilic natural fibres) and matrix (petrochemical-derived thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers).

All-cellulose composites (ACCs) represent a relatively new class of composites that unlike other biocomposites are made entirely from cellulosic materials and therefore have a chemically identical matrix and reinforcing phase. This presentation will discuss the processing-structure-property relationships of all-cellulose composites by giving an overview of work carried out at the University of Canterbury.
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Date of update May 29, 2013

Grenoble INP Institut d'ingénierie Univ. Grenoble Alpes